World Magazine
Hearing held to pressure Sudan and the White House to do more for detained Christians
   
Liberal groups in Portland, Ore., are taking an evangelical children’s camp to task for talking to the city’s youngest residents about Jesus. The camps, which operate like a traveling Vacation Bible School, have endured protests, negative advertisements in local newspapers, and accusations of being a fundamentalist sect. Child Evangelism Fellowship’s Camp Good News focuses for a week or two in different cities each year. During the school year, the group rents public school
   
This article is part of a new series called White House Wednesday, by the staff of The World and Everything in It, looking at potential 2016 candidates for president. The crisis at the nation’s southern border could give Rick Perry the foundation he needs to launch a second presidential campaign. In 2012, Perry’s strong jobs record helped him start a strong campaign with immediate impact. Just one month after announcing his candidacy, a Gallup poll showed Perry atop the GOP field,
   
The Heritage Foundation for years has published a useful Index of Economic Freedom, and this morning it introduced another helpful compendium, the 2014 Index of Culture and Opportunity. In it we can see that the violent crime rate dropped by 22 percent from 2002 to 2012 and the marriage rate dropped by 23 percent. Only about half of American adults are currently married, and about half of American children will spend some time outside an intact, married home. America’s total
   
More downed planes. Ukrainian officials say two of the country’s fighter jets have been shot down as clashes with pro-Russian separatists in the east escalate. The government in Kiev claims its troops have retaken two cities in the Luhansk region, which declared independence earlier this year in what many observers say was a sham referendum. Russian has reportedly increased its troop presence along the border. Slightly to the north, in the government-controlled city of Kharkiv, a Dutch
   
Bails of razor wire. Street blockades. Thousands of police officers and military troops with weapons at the ready. On Tuesday evening, downtown Jakarta looked ready to repel a small invasion. Electoral officials in Indonesia’s capital city wanted to be careful on the day they announced the nation’s next president.  Two weeks after 134 million Indonesian citizens cast their ballots in a direct, democratic election, Joko “Jokowi” Widodo won a two-ticket race with 53 percent of
   
President Barack Obama signed an executive order Monday that bars federal contractors from considering an employee’s sexual proclivities or gender identity when hiring. He granted no exemption for Christians or people of other faiths whose beliefs and teachings run counter to these behaviors. It seems the more such rights are granted, the fewer Christians have. Faith-based organizations have a choice, though it might not be ideal. They can stop taking federal contracts if they don’t
   
A Swedish nurse is suing after a women’s center rescinded its job offer to her because she said her faith prevented her from performing abortions. In Spring 2013, Ellinor Grimmark completed a successful midwifery internship at Höglandssjukhuset women’s center, where she had already worked as a nurse. The center offered her a job upon graduation, but then rescinded it when she told them of her pro-life views. Grimmark received her midwifery degree in January 2014. Grimmark told a
   
WASHINGTON—The Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Tuesday approved a controversial disabilities treaty, renewing a battle with conservatives who say it could be used to expand abortion and strip parents of the right to homeschool their children. The Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) passed on a 12-6 vote, almost identical to the 13-6 tally two years ago. Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and John Barrasso, R-Wyo., joined 10 Democrats in voting to send the treaty
   
I spent the day with a 7-year-old. Not my 7-year-old grandson but the neighbor’s grandchild. (“If you can’t be with the one you love, love the one you’re with.”) A day with a 7-year-old boy is more like a competition than a relationship. In everything he is faster and better than you are—even when he’s not. All day long you are “the rotten egg” for losing the race to the car, or tying your shoes more slowly. And he is the alpha dog to whom you submit for upbraiding about
   
The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a lawsuit on July 14 seeking an injunction against an Arizona law that prohibits sex and race-selective abortions, claiming the law intended to protect women is a form of racial discrimination.  Arizona’s “Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act of 2011” bans abortionists from providing sex-selective abortions. Violators could face up to 3 1/2 years in prison and lose their medical licenses.
   
UPDATE (2 p.m. EDT): The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the Internal Revenue Service correctly interpreted the will of Congress in doling out Obamacare subsides, coming to the opposite conclusion of the D.C. Circuit Court. A three-judge panel issued the unanimous ruling. After losing in the D.C. court, Obama administration officials said they would appeal to the court's full, 11-member panel. While the case plays out, Obamacare enrollees who bought insurance on the federal
   
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu today called for the international community to hold Hamas accountable for its continued rejection of cease-fire offers, amid ongoing and intense fighting along the Gaza Strip that has left more than 600 Palestinians, 27 Israeli troops, and two Israeli civilians dead. Netanyahu compared Hamas to al-Qaeda and has repeatedly criticized its attacks on Israeli citizens. As the fighting shows no sign of abating, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration
   
Of course we’ll help. Russian President Vladimir Putin said during a Security Council meeting today he would try to use his influence with pro-Russian separatists in Ukraine to help investigate the crash of Malaysian Airlines Flight 17. “Everything that is in our power we, of course, will do,” Putin said. “Russia will do everything that depends on it to ensure a full, comprehensive, in-depth and transparent investigation.”But on Monday, Russia made it clear it has no intention
   
Humility partly comes from espousing heartily today an opinion that you were as adamantly opposed to yesterday. This is how I feel about “small talk.” For most of my life I was against it. Even the name is universally disparaging. Who could defend it? Small talk is talk without teleology, without purpose, without an important message to communicate. It is wasting your time of day. My change of mind regarding small talk has come after noticing that I have not learned much about anyone
   
As the nation debates its collective responsibility for the Sewol disaster, Christians preach the message of grace
   
President Barack Obama on Monday ignored the concerns of religious conservatives and signed an executive order adding sexuality and gender identity to a list of things federal contractors may not consider when making hiring decisions. He did not explain his decision to ignore requests for an exemption, but he told LGBT supporters at the White House he believed in the “irrefutable rightness” of their cause. “America’s federal contracts should not subsidize discrimination against
   
Western leaders call for justice and accountability, but no one is willing to say for sure who is responsible
   
If you’re seeking a Christian ballplayer to cheer for, check out Daniel Nava of the Boston Red Sox. His is a Cinderella tale of movement from washing laundry to marrying royalty to being dumped to maintaining a great attitude and making his way back. After an undistinguished California high school career, Nava walked on at Santa Clara University but was cut from the team. He became the team manager, which meant washing the uniforms of other players. He kept practicing and eventually
   
Radio talk show host JJ Jasper had a great life. He was a syndicated radio personality, a successful author, and a happily married father of five. His life was so good he could tell jokes about it as a standup comic. But then the unthinkable happened. Following an accident on his family farm near Tupelo, Miss., Jasper’s only son, Cooper, died. It sent Jasper and his wife, Melanie, into the depths of a grief from which they’ve never fully recovered, but which, over time, Jasper has
   
GAZA: The UN reports the death toll in Gaza has crossed 500, and the world body is calling for an immediate cease-fire. That’s what Israel, Egypt, the Arab League, and others wanted a week ago when Hamas said no. Rarely does international politics present such moments of moral clarity, writes Charles Krauthammer on the Israeli-Gaza conflict. “Here’s the difference between us,” said Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. “We’re using missiledefense to protect our
   
An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus is attacking Western Africa in a way health workers have never seen. “It is serious because it’s the first time that we have Ebola outbreaks in three different countries,” said Tarik Jasarevic of the World Health Organization. In Guinea, he is monitoring the outbreak that has spread to Liberia and Sierra Leone. Since March, there have been 964 reported cases and 603 deaths that he knows of. “This time around it is very challenging because
   
When Eric Cantor (R-Va.), the House majority leader, unexpectedly lost his party’s nomination to seek reelection our sympathies soon abated when we realized that what faces him on the far side of his abruptly ended political career is an opportunity for amassing great wealth. Nonetheless, in his no doubt sumptuously supplied dotage, he will receive a pension from the public purse. According to the Congressional Research Service, members of Congress are eligible for a pension after five
   
Daniel Pipes, American historian and founder of the Middle East Forum, has kept an eye on Islam and its adherents for decades. It’s an occupation that puts him on the front lines for both praise and criticism, but whether or not his critics agree, Pipes usually has something interesting to say. Last year, he predicted that “Islamism” (radical as opposed to moderate Islam) had peaked as a world phenomenon and was soon to go into decline. In the last few months, with all hard-won
   
Sending a message. A Pensacola, Fla., jury awarded $23.6 billion late Friday to the widow of a longtime smoker who died of lung cancer. The verdict against R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., the nation’s second-biggest cigarette maker, is massive for an individual tobacco suit and includes punitive damages. R.J. Reynolds executive J. Jeffery Raborn called it a “runaway verdict” and vowed to appeal. An attorney for the plaintiff, Cynthia Robinson, said the verdict sends a message to Big
   
The downside of writing a daily online posting and a biweekly magazine column is that you get to know all my sins. This is partly because I’m not the sportswriter and partly because it is impossible to write so many words without getting around to it. Today’s shameful confession is that I have been a terrible aunt. My five nieces and nephews have grown up with nary a birthday or Christmas card from me. I didn’t mean for it to happen. I always dutifully transcribed their birth dates
   
ISIS militants give Christians a final ultimatum, forcing them to flee or be killed
   
Wall Street rising. Stocks rose last week. In fact, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday continued a winning streak on the Dow that began the week before. The markets seemed to be responding to an upbeat earnings report from Citigroup. Citi is not one of the 30 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, but financial stocks are weighted heavier in the Dow. Citi’s results pushed other financial stocks up, and that sent the Dow up significantly on Monday. Then on Tuesday, we got
   
Separatists accused of removing evidence, blocking access to the wreckage
   
Pastor Kevin DeYoung wants us to embrace every bit of God’s Word
   
Christ’s Kingdom Commission: The Strategic Importance of Evangelism to “Kings and All in Authority” By David J. Andersen The ministry of the Isaianic Suffering Servant was to be “a light for the nations, that [God’s] salvation may reach to the end of the earth” (Isaiah 49:6, ESV). The same statement appears programmatically in the book of Acts, where the apostles are told to witness in Jerusalem, Samaria, and the “end of the earth.” When the book ends, Paul is in
   
Watch Dogs offers a startling look at technological over-reach but suffers from unoriginal gameplay and very mature content
   
After five minutes, a single cigarette burning in a car generates a higher concentration of smoke than can be found many bar rooms, and that’s no environment for a child, British lawmakers say. The government of Wales announced this week that its would become the first in the United Kingdom to enact a ban on smoking in cars with children. Last year, Parliament voted to allow regional governments to enforce such bans. England is expected to follow with a law in 2015, according to the
   
Weird Al Yankovic—the famous parodist who turned Michael Jackson’s “Beat It” into “Eat It” and The Knack’s “My Sharona” into “My Bologna”—strikes again. With successful parodies in all of the last three decades, Yankovic sparked a media stir this week by releasing different humorous music videos every day to promote his new album Mandatory Fun . The results reveal that Yankovic hasn’t lost a beat, but is still the funniest, wittiest parody-maker around. 
   
For months, politicians and the media have described the influx of child immigrants as a humanitarian crisis. As the summer months wear away, people are turning their attention to where the children will be in the fall, wondering whether the public schools they will enter might face a crisis of their own. The 1982 Supreme Court decision Plyler v. Doe guarantees illegal immigrant children access to public education. The number of unaccompanied children crossing the southwest border has
   
On July 20, 1969, Buzz Aldrin missed out on a massive celebration here on earth as he and Neil Armstrong became the first humans to land on the moon. So for Sunday’s 45th anniversary of the moon landing, he’s asking everyone to share online where they were when they first heard about the historic achievement. “What a day that was,” said actor Tom Hanks, sipping from an Apollo 11 commemorative cup. He starred in the 1995 film Apollo 13 , another gripping story from NASA’s
   
A roundup of wacky news
   
Enrollment in The Honor Academy, once at 1,000 per year, has dwindled to less than 100
   
WASHINGTON—When Wesley J. Smith was young, parents who couldn’t have children often adopted. Smith remembers growing up with adopted kids, and as a senior fellow at the Discovery Institute, he talks with parents who adopt. But in the near future, some adults could skip adoption in favor of genetically modified babies—with three parents. Rep. Andy Harris, R-Md., said at the Family Research Council on Thursday that the government
   
In January 1942, a squad of Axis soldiers in the Balkans lined up hundreds of Serbians and Jews along the Danube River, stripped them naked in the winter cold, and massacred them with rifles and bayonets. A Nazi dentist named Elimar Luder Precht selected Auschwitz inmates with gold or platinum teeth for execution. Helmut Steinmetz killed a crippled Jewish man in the street in Warsaw, Poland. On Thursday, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum will open public, digital access to the
   
 
   
 
   
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